Yes, your classes are sold out, and your clients are happier than ever. But that doesn’t mean it’s time to rest on your laurels—there always room for improvement, and in this case, expansion.  We’ve come up with some quick and easy ways to give your studio the shot in the arm it needs during these hot summer days to maintain and grow your success.

BRING ON THE BOOZE
The core purpose of our industry is to help others achieve their best selves through fitness—but a mimosa never really hurt anyone. Consider hosting a Saturday brunch series where clients can attend their favorite class, followed by some healthy breakfast bites (think yogurt parfaits, fruit cups and egg white fritatas). Similarly, you can transition the idea to evening with a happy hour. The purpose is to gather your clients in a non-class environment where everyone can kick back and get to know one another a little better.

FIND A CAUSE
There’s nothing that brings people closer than a joint cause, and finding a local charity or family in need is a great way to build your studio’s community while also giving back to the greater good.

At the Bar Method in Madison, New Jersey, owner Gina Striffler recently raised thousands of dollars for LUNGevity, Dress for Success, American Cancer Society, and for two local children with cancer.  A few weeks ago Striffler dedicated a block of classes in honor of a local 6th grade boy who began his battle with cancer this past March. Her clients filled all classes, wore the boy’s school colors and banded together to “TUCK CANCER.” [Note: Tuck is a word used in Bar Method classes.] Striffler set up a sign made by his 6th grade class next to an old-fashioned money jar and raised over $2,000 for him in just a few hours. “Our Bar community consists largely of women who have children who shouldn’t and couldn’t fathom the unthinkable strain cancer has on a child and their family.  Collectively, we pause, we pray and we provide all that we can without hesitation,” said Striffler, who matched a portion of the proceeds. “We have created a very unique and special place – clients feel like they’re a part of something that is more than just exercise.”

HOST A TRUNK SHOW
Tupperware parties may be a thing of the past, but the concept of gathering women in a social way with wine, conversation and a little shopping is clearly here to stay. You likely have a staffer or client who reps one of the big social-selling companies out there—Stella & Dot, Beautycounter and Rodan & Fields among them—and hosting a trunk show after a class is a great way to bring in new potential clients, while also treating your mainstay students to a fun girls night.

DYNAMIC DUOS
A great way to introduce your brand to new clients is to host a “plus one” night for regulars, where they can bring their husband or best friend to experience a class together.

Striffler has hosted a “Babes, Bites & Bubbly” night for clients and their spouses, where they take a barre class together followed by a mixer with healthy snacks and champagne. Another take is the “Bring Your Bestie” class, which Striffler found to be even more successful in terms of client capture, as women are more likely to become barre followers than men. Typically she offers the class for free to the plus one, and rolls out a one-night-only, significantly discounted new client special for anyone who wants to purchase a package.

GUEST SPEAKERS
Another way to expand upon your studio’s offerings is to host a regular guest speaker series off-hours, where your clients can come to discuss and engage on topics far and wide—consider everything from nutrition and meditation to menopause and post-partum wellness. We suggest opening the series to the public (consider charging a small fee for non-members), so that potential clients can get a sneak peek of your space and put a face with your studio’s name.

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